Is All Petrol & Diesel The Same?

Filling up car with fuelIt’s a common question that often triggers big arguments.

Is branded petrol and diesel better than supermarket fuel, or should you just buy the cheapest you can find?

The problem is that most people don’t know how the fuel business works, and the truth is a well-kept trade secret. Let me explain.

The Easy Bit – Premium Fuels (Shell V-Power, BP Ultimate, etc.)

We’ll start with the easy bit.

Premium fuels, such as Shell V-Power Nitro+ and BP Ultimate, are not the same as regular petrol or diesel , although you can mix them freely with standard fuels without problems.

Petrol like this is known as ‘super unleaded’. Confusingly, the petrol that is labelled as ‘premium unleaded’ on forecourt pumps (e.g. Shell Fuelsave) is actually standard petrol. When it comes to fuel, super is better than premium!

These ‘super unleaded’ fuels cost several pence per litre more than regular unleaded. For this extra money, you get a different, more sophisticated package of additives for cleaning and lubrication, and fuel with a higher octane rating.

It’s a similar story with ‘super’ diesels, like BP Ultimate Diesel.

Octane (petrol) and cetane (diesel) ratings describe the way a fuel burns inside an engine. Broadly speaking, a higher rating means a fuel will burn more efficiently and effectively inside your engine. This may improve performance and/or economy slightly – although not all drivers will see a noticeable difference.

Some supermarkets also offer their own super unleaded — notably Tesco, which offers Tesco Momentum 99 octane. This is usually cheaper than Shell V-Power or BP Ultimate, but opinions vary as to whether it provides the same engine cleaning and mpg improvements as the top two fuels.

Another point is that Tesco Momentum 99 super unleaded reportedly contains more ethanol than super unleaded fuels like BP Ultimate. This provides an octane boost but some people believe it doesn’t provide the same efficiency gains as the more expensive branded fuels.

Like everything to do with fuel, people have different opinions, and the facts are hard to find.

Standard Unleaded and Diesel Fuels

The big debate is over whether the standard petrol and diesel sold by supermarkets is the same quality as that sold by branded fuel companies like Shell, BP, Esso and Total.

Let’s start with some known facts:

All fuels sold in the UK conform to the relevant British Standards. This means that they should all work in roughly the same way and you can mix them freely in your car’s fuel tank.

The standard petrol and diesel that’s sold on garage forecourts is mixture of two things:

  • ‘Base’ fuel
  • An additive package

The base fuel is the same for all companies – in fact, it usually comes from the same tanks at the local fuel refinery/distribution centre. What varies is the additives package that goes into the fuel. These additives packages are secret recipes of extra ingredients that help keep the engine clean and improve lubrication inside the engine cylinders.

Each fuel company has its own additives packages and these are different. So it is possible (but not common) for some drivers to feel that their car responds better to the additives used by one fuel manufacturer over those of another.

What About Supermarket Fuels?

There are all sorts of stories that go round about supermarket fuels, but the fact is that supermarket fuel tanker lorries are often seen filling up from the same tanks as branded fuel lorries (e.g. Shell, BP) – so the chances are that most of the time, the fuel they sell is the same, although again, it may have different additives packages.

However, one common story about supermarket fuel is that some supermarkets don’t have a regular fuel supplier. Instead, they buy odd lots of fuel from wherever it’s cheapest, including abroad. This could (if it happened) lead to supermarket fuel having a more variable set of additives than branded fuels.

Not many people really know the truth about this business, and they are not the kind of people who will reveal all on the internet. Unfortunately, that means we will have to keep guessing as to whether there is any meaningful difference between supermarket fuels and branded fuels.

As you can see from the many comments below, many drivers have strong (and opposing) views on this subject! Feel free to join in the conversation.

124 thoughts on “Is All Petrol & Diesel The Same?

  • November 13, 2015 at 2:56 pm
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    Hi all. Shell V Power/BP Ultimate vs Supermarket diesel. A case history, not scientific, but from some one who has driven nearly a million miles (now retired thankfully)
    Have a 1.6 Hdi Focus bought new, now with 18k miles, and much loved. Initially started with the S/mkt stuff as it was convenient and it seemed ok. My neighbours son accidentally put VPower diesel in their Merc with amazing results. In a way this was a blind test as ‘dad’ didn’t know about the super fuel in the tank. He just noticed the increase in performance and economy. So I said I would try the same for the sake of a few quid. Ran the tank to near empty and filled with Shell VPower diesel. The car felt different after about 50 miles and even better after 300. Economy improved markedly on a regular 220 mile round trip (mostly dual carriageway but 25% urban). At the time I calculated that it was costing me 8% more to fill up but with a 10% improvement in mpg. (Checked by filling brim to brim not the car’s read out) Apart from that the car ‘felt’ better.
    Ford Dealership confirmed that they have similar results and they’re not selling me fuel.

    When the prices dropped a few months ago I balked at the difference between Shell V and the very low Asda/Sains/Tesco prices. A massive percentage. So I reverted to the S/mkt stuff. The car just never felt lively and mpg was reduced (on the same regular run). After about 1000 miles of that I decided to bite the bullet.

    With about 5lts left in the tank, I filled up with BP Ultimate last week. The improvement was evident within 50 miles, performance and mpg as previously with Vpower and the car is noticeably quieter. I don’t know how this happens but it does. My regular 220 miler is tomorrow so will be checking carefully. May feed back on that.

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    • November 23, 2015 at 9:58 pm
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      I used to have a diesel Peugeot 407 SW. It used to block the particle filter regularly – the car would not accelerate, had to change down on minor rises (A.1 above Morpeth) etc. No ‘GO’!
      Car was looked after by a retired guy who had been Foreman in a main dealer workshop. He asked what I was filling it with. I told him it was Asda special. He advised running the fuel right down and brimming the tank with Shell VPower, which I did. The car ‘flew’ (almost) and added an extra 50 miles to a tank full.
      I no longer need a larger car so have bought a s/h Volvo C30 – 2L 6 speed Diesel. The vendor
      recommended VPower – I said, “You are talking to the converted”!
      I do 6 x 650 mile (in a day!) round trips a year, + normal daily running around. I do not hang about on the long runs! The on-board computer holds a steady 52.5 mpg all year round.
      OK, extra cash at the pump, but for driving pleasure and great mpg, I figure it’s worth it.
      Shell would not make the stuff if nobody bought it! Do yourself a favour and (with a clean dpf) and try it. You’ll be amazed.
      No, I do NOT have any connection with Shell Fuels.
      p.s. Next 650 miler is Xmas day – not much traffic about – I’ll let you know.

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      • June 26, 2016 at 10:35 am
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        Xt 600 single cylinder: this bike lets me know of any changes in fuel type,probably coz combustion happens in one single bang.Ran it on momentum 99 for 2 years; then swapped to shell v power.Smoother and a bit more poke.

      • August 2, 2016 at 4:47 pm
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        On my KIA Ceed crdi 6 spd. auto I used Shell V power and then reverted to standard Shell and found absolutely no difference in performance or mpg. this was over 9 months checked brim to brim. same journey. I now have for 7 months new Kia Ceed crdi 7 spd auto and started with standard Shell or Esso. A few weeks ago I filled up with Asda diesel only because it was convenient but never again. However I am now using Morrisons City Diesel and find it very good performance seems better than standard Shell, same mpg 44 mpg , with my previous 6 speed torque converter box I only got 34 mpg combined.

    • December 1, 2016 at 7:26 pm
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      Yes we can look at Monomolecular Trybo Additives this is well known technology, it basically cuts friction ok there is a cost for this but those in the know actually know it’s worth every penny. Having worked at James Walkers as Sales Rep for 5 years (a UK Seal Company but they got involved with testing special seals & some RD etc) Apparently their Technical Director got a report showing how effective this fluid was, and basically they bought some Tribology Testers which we carried with us to show customers Tribology is the study of science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It includes the study and application of the principles of friction, well this fluid reduced friction big time it worked on their tester, basically a motor spins a test disc with and firstly without the Additive, and you can see the Feet Lbs force we put on till fail then we added the additive which reduced the friction amazingly, James Walkers don’t stock the Fluid now cause I used to Buy it myself and sold it to Chief Engineers etc in the know to add to their Oil, I still use a similar product. So I filled up at Sainsburys to day with yes I use their Super Unleaded, having also used the BP equivalent with I found to be be excellent.

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  • November 23, 2015 at 1:34 pm
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    Had an uncle with garage who every other year cleaned out diesel tank in ground as full of fatty sludge ! So even the storage tanks sludge up as well as vehicle tank , hence the need for additives , cousin advised on when their were no additives in the base fuel as it was quicker to fill tanker ! Both sadly passed away due to cancers , my own experience as a county manager in my beamer was that my fills @ Sainsbury every week was that the evening one coincided with delivery by bp tanker so assume it was .Had a knock so took to dealer after brand fill up who said supermarket fuel was problem really ? .Took car to local injection specialist who said system clean and knock from cooling system ! & turned out to be plastic component in system so dealer will blame most convenient non cost source . I converted to a diesel dpf and from the start used millers and never had a problem as bought by the box for the years I had it . Now have van & suv which is known to have dpf problems if short journey so bought some similar additive to ensure fuel is burnt off as the dealers burn your fuel off if you get dpf block anyway , so its preventative & cheaper as mpg better by a little . All supermarkets can buy on the spot markets where the source is dubious so base quality is variable hence car makers must choose a base for predicting mpg so will opt for brands .Also most fuel is produced for the average motorist who wants mpg and cheaper ! My ethos is cold weather is what sorts out the best from the worst and prefer to add my own mix as I know what I am getting and have noted the difference when I had the beamer as octane is everything in high performance so which ever way you choose you pay , the arch choice is yours !

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  • December 6, 2015 at 7:42 pm
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    Hi, filling up at Asda the tanker driver was beside me and I asked about additives, He said Asda has the engine additives and produced his bill of sale from the refinery in Grangemouth showing that he had the additives. Always buy Asda petrol now. No problems. And no kickback from services.

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    • January 23, 2016 at 4:23 pm
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      Ha Ha they may use additives on that day and what type did they add??

      Since when did you see a supermarket give something for nothing wake up people, if you buy a value product thats what you get simples they clean there tanks regular for a reason.

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    • April 5, 2016 at 3:14 pm
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      Ha I am a tanker driver buddy and we don’t carry any information with us about the exact additives and it wouldn’t list it on a bill of sale which we also don’t carry with us we have a computer that prints out a receipt for the retailer and that doesn’t mention any additives. Anyway my advice always use brand fuel doesn’t matter which brand just don’t go supermarket. What would u prefer rola cola or real Coca Cola I no which is go for

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    • November 28, 2016 at 10:38 am
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      All fuel got additives. But “super” fuels have different type of additives for lubrication and cleaning. Tesco, Asda etc has only standard additives and no cleaning additives in their super fuels. That’s what I have been told!

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  • December 7, 2015 at 11:08 am
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    Asda driver showed you a bill of sale for the additives… Awesome! finally someone solved the mystery of shite supermarket fuel! —Also— 5 years of Petroleum Engineering down the tube 🙂

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    • April 6, 2016 at 10:22 pm
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      These agent provocateurs can write some crazy stories. Good comment. Driver with list of additives. He must have done his homework.

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  • December 8, 2015 at 8:17 am
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    My Volvo v50 first went into “limp mode” on a long journey after filling the tank from empty at Asda. I always use Asda diesel as its cheap and convenient. When the car lost power I was on a dangerous stretch of the A69. After “limping” to a parking area I switched off and let the systems all reset. On restart everything was fine, to begin with, then the problem reoccurred until eventually the car cut out every mile or so. The vehicle was taken to a Volvo dealer and the first question they asked was “do you use Asda diesel?”. I was horrified. It turns out that my fuel filter was completely clogged and needed replacing. The filter was only 3 months old as it had been changed on the last service.
    I will never use Asda diesel ever again, nor any of the supermarkets for that matter. For the extra few pence a litre that I now pay for BP I more than get my moneys worth in enhanced performance, peace of mind and the reliability and safety from a much happier engine.

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    • December 8, 2015 at 4:07 pm
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      Good lad – you’ve joined the clan! Checked your mpg now? My (now) C30 does almost 60 extra miles to a tank full, so the extra pennies give extra miles. But, as everyone knows, nobody drives a C30 at more than 50mph 🙂

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    • January 24, 2016 at 8:11 am
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      Sainsbury’s fuel is BP. I have used nothing else for the last eight years with three Volvos and have been very happy with performance, clean running and economy – both petrol and diesel.

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      • April 5, 2016 at 3:18 pm
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        I work for bp mate it’s definatly not the same way more additives in Bp and more additive means healthier engine

    • August 2, 2016 at 4:51 pm
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      I agree with you I will never use Asda Diesel again. However I find Morrisons City Diesel to be very good.

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  • December 11, 2015 at 7:58 am
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    I had the same problem with sluggish performance for years I used supermarket fuels,change to any big brand and noticed a big difference in performance and mpg.it all outweighs the pennies in litre prices and will never go back ,I have converted my daughter to this with big results from a dodgy starter to a smooth running car.
    Convinced there is a difference so we will never go back to supermarkets.

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  • December 16, 2015 at 10:51 am
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    From what I have read, most people are on about diesel, not too many people seem to use petrol now. Diesels don’t like short journeys, even more so one’s with DPF. I have been advised by numerous people not to have a diesel for my 8 mile commute. I have been using Morrisons petrol for about a year now in a 1.8T petrol A4 and get roughly 27-30mpg, mostly “extra urban” driving. I might try 44 litres of branded fuel to see if I get any extra from it. Very interesting reading this.

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    • January 3, 2016 at 9:07 pm
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      I have a Renaultsport Megane (2L turbo) and someone suggested I try Shell V Power petrol as it often suits a turbo aspirated engine. The difference was better performance and significantly improved mpg. I now get an extra 50 miles on a tank full and the extra mpg means that even using v-power it more than pays for itself. It’s a no brainier. I can’t recommend it enough.

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    • March 3, 2016 at 1:52 pm
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      Your 1.8t should almost certainly be run on super (97) rather than standard 95, this will be confirmed in both the fuel filler flap and in the manual. Whilst standard 95 fuel is ok and it works you should notice vast improvements using super unleaded. I have a Golf GTI and always, without fail use either Sainsbury’s super or Shell/BP super and the car runs so well on both returning 32-35mpg about town and up to 40 on a run. My new Scirocco will never have supermarket Diesel in, its always had a combo of normal branded or premium diesels in, the cost is roughly 70p per tank more for standard vs supermarket prices and £5.00 for V-Power/Ultimate however, the extra £5 usually gives me an additional 30-60 miles about town and between 50-90 miles on a run so, its always worth spending that little bit more. The Golf I have hadn’t been run on Super for a while when I bought it so, expect to use 2-3 full tanks before you see improvements.

      If you wouldn’t drink 19p cola, or cheap and nasty beer/wine, bootleg vodka etc….. then why make your car. VW group vehicles appear to be very fuel sensitive and, yes, whilst supermarket fuels meet requirements they will be the bare minimum they have to be, this is why all manufactures use their own recommended suppliers for example Renault/Peugeot used to be Elf and are now Total, VW group work with Castrol which is owned by BP, Honda recommend Shell…… If the manufactures give recommendations its because they’ve spent millions working out the most affective liquid/lubrication packages for the customer vehicles.

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  • December 16, 2015 at 5:18 pm
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    My experience with my first Ford Modeo TDCi (2003) was that it got to a point where it needed the injectors recoding every 6 to 9 months. Fortunately I got a Fordiag device and was able to do it myself but it seemed to become necessary more frequently as the car got older. I had been using supermarket diesel but then switched to BP Ultimate to give it a go. Almost immediately the engine was a lot quieter but within 2 weeks I had to recode after the fuel switch. However I had the car for over two years after that and constantly on the BP Ultimate during which time it then never needed recoding again. Would appear pretty conclusive there is a difference in quality. I also noticed a significant improvement in fuel economy, so much so that the supermarket diesel would need to be 25p a litre cheaper to be the same mile for mile fuel cost forgetting the injector recoding requirements.
    I now have a 2010 Mondeo TDCi and find it runs really well on BP Ultimate or Texaco Supreme but not quite as well on Shell V-Power. I gave this one a run on supermarket diesel and it was a lot noisier almost immediately and the fuel economy suffered. I won’t be buying supermarket diesel ever again.

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  • December 31, 2015 at 9:21 pm
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    I live in Cornwall and use texaco diesel fuel have found problems with it. The engine knocks
    On take up. My other cars have cat problems. When I fill up in south east engine is fine
    So must be the adertives they use in cornwall

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  • January 6, 2016 at 2:11 pm
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    I have a 2009 Diesel Corsa with DPF. In my area, premium diesel is about 10p/litre more expensive than regular supermarket diesel. I bought Millers additive, and, about 150 miles later, the car was running much smoother. I did the calculations and adding Millers makes the regular diesel approximately 3p/litre more expensive. Thus, one spends 7p/litre less by using the additive instead of premium diesel, while producing the same cleaning and performance effect.

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  • January 16, 2016 at 10:28 am
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    I bought a brand new Volvo V40 Cross Country and immediately filled it with diesel from my local Tesco; a fuel I never had an issue with in my Nissan Note. After as little as two weeks of ownership my engine check light came on so I pulled over and called Volvo Assist. The technician plugged my car into his laptop and frowned, he asked what fuel I was using and I told him. He advised using the top 3 (Shell, BP or Esso) wherever possible. It really is worth the extra few pence plus my local BP run a Fuel Save event when is you

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  • January 19, 2016 at 1:29 am
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    There are plenty of pieces around the net and in newspapers suggesting that ‘…..all diesel is mostly alike’ etc etc. Even the writer here has sort of alluded to all things being equal aside from the additives. But seriously, it just CAN NOT be right, can it?!!
    I know nothing about the petroleum industry, save for The Fractional Distillation of Crude Oil table that we all covered in chemistry. Yet I’ve heard enough anecdotal evidence from many motorists, and even more evidence from mechanics to figure out that supermarket diesel, especially ASDA’s, is not the same as that sold by the big oil companies. There’s enough just on this page, and it’s always the same story. Rough running, leading to blocked filters, and then complete failure. I was once told an apocryphal tale, the essence of which being that ASDA purchase their diesel from the bottom of the barrel, (literally), and that is how they always keep their prices low, not because it is a so called ‘loss leader’. I’m sure there’d be a lot of people employed within the industry who’d read that and yell “rubbish!”, “….that’s not how it works!” etc. But it sure would explain a lot.
    Either way, I’ve run a fleet of diesels for over 30 years, (long before they became the norm), starting with Renault 18 GTDs and Sierra 2.3DLs, and I NEVER have, nor would I ever use supermarket diesel, not even if they were giving it away.

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  • January 20, 2016 at 4:37 am
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    You never used supermarket diesel than what is your point to prove?

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  • January 30, 2016 at 11:35 am
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    I have a 2009 Corsa 1.3 diesel and my mechanic showed me what he had got out of an X Trail that was a bit sluggish like mine. It was like an emulsified sludge and when he asked the owner if he used Supermarket fuel he told him always from Morrisons. I immediately changed supplier to BP and felt the car was a lot better. Unfortunately I got an Astra petrol and passed the car to my wife who likes Tesco and uses it regularly. The car has spent 11 days at said mechanics as it developed a starting problem where it felt like it was missing on one cylinder then would pick up as normal and drive like normal. I booked it in to the garage for the mechanic to have a look but when he managed to get it started there was so much white smoke in the garage he had to push the car outside. He couldn’t start it after that. He has now drained the fuel and refilled with £10 of BP diesel and the car is going like a dream. Unfortunately the only evidence of my wife filling up is her credit card statement as the pay at the pump slips were out of action (as is quite the norm now!) so where do I stand about going back to them about the fuel being dodgy. Should I pay to have a sample tested? Before anyone says it sounds like she put petrol in, the car was run from nearly empty to just over half full before the problems started and a burn test of the fuel shows that it is diesel.

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  • January 31, 2016 at 8:25 pm
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    Many years ago, when unleaded petrol became manditory, a UK motorcycle magazine pointed out that in order to keep the RON Octane rating up, the calorific energy content per litre was dropped by as much as 20% by reducing the Toluene content substantially.

    This produced a noticeable drop in performance in all motorcycle produced up to the date of compulsory unleaded use in the UK.

    Two years ago I found a garage selling leaded 4 star petrol for classic vehilces and treated my 2 stroke 350cc bike to a 5 litres of the stuff….. it went like a rocket ship when compared to the normal ethanol super unleaded I normally used (and obviously didn’t have those damaging effects that ethanol has on fuel hoses, carbs, etc.). Once back on super unleaded the performnace dropped to the normal lack of enthusiasm in the top 20% of the rev range.

    My son rides a 1980’s commuter 125 to work everyday and we thought that the fact that the bike could only reach a grudging 55 MPH instead of the book top speed of 76 MPH was due to its age, despite having a rebore and engine rebuild. However a younger sibling version of identical specification but with only 4,000 miles on the clock was aquired and this also has the exact same problem, having the exact same lack of top speed and power compared to manufacturer’s original specifications.

    It is more than evident that the old leaded petrol gave far better performance than the modern ethanol stuff and didn’t destroy a vehcile’s fueling system or fuel tank during use.

    The problem for the fuel manufacturer’s was that they’ve had to start from scratch solving the Octane rating versus energy content of modern fuels.

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  • February 7, 2016 at 8:38 pm
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    We have two Skoda Fabia Diesel cars which we have had from new,
    Mine is a 1.9TDI my wife has a 1.4 TDI. We had always filled up at our local Asda store, I swore it ran better than the fuel from Tesco and Morrisons.
    Money was tight and fuel was fuel or so I thought.
    Last year my wife’s car developed a fault, every time it started up from cold it would emit large clouds of white smoke.
    Took it to a local garage who had a look at it, advised me it was a specialist fault and I needed to take it to a diesel specialist. They changed the wiring harness to the injectors (at a cost of £80)
    Still faulty and still blowing smoke and running shite. On a 3 cylinder car you notice a loss of power when only 2 work !!
    Injectors, £400 plus labour each !!!
    I was looking for another motor as I could not justify the cost of £1200+, or my suggestion, she waited till the engine warmed up and then it was ok.
    Just then, our local Costco store opened it’s new fuel station.
    After only 1 tank of fuel the problem stopped as quickly as it had started, it never as long as we could remember would climb a hill near our house in fourth gear.
    I fuelled up, it is like rocket fuel. More power, more miles per tank.
    And the best part, it is premium fuel with performance additives like you find at Shell and BP garages but, they sell it 2 to 3p cheaper than those dreadful supermarkets sell their ‘Base’ fuel as you call it.
    I’m told Costco currently have three stations, Sheffield opens one this month and over the next few years all of their stores will be selling high spec fuels below supermarket and most certainly below so called Premium brands. Premium Diesel today is 95.9p a Litre.

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  • February 13, 2016 at 11:32 pm
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    When you use garden tools which run on primitive 2 stroke engines, they are sensitive to fuel quality, with normal Tesco petrol only a few hours old from the pump, I can pull away at my chainsaw for two hours and the f***ing thing won’t start, but put Regular shell fuel in which is the same price at the moment, two pulls and it starts without problems, what the actual F***!

    I have noticed a minor difference between supermarket fuel and the stuff from known brand dealers, my 1 litre, 3 cylinder hatchback feels less nippy with supermarket fuel and I swear that I’m getting less MPG, only by a couple of miles but I do notice when filling up, you just stand their filling up, then looking at how far you’ve traveled, do the maths then wonder why it varies when the journey you drive everyday rarely changes.

    There must be a quality difference, yes the supermarket stuff must pass the quality laws, but they don’t have to exceed them, which is something I feel the known fuel sellers are doing, they even advertise it on occasion, supermarket is fine for modern cars but older motorbikes and small two stroke engines are not keen on it from my experience.

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  • February 20, 2016 at 11:54 am
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    My dad used to swear by Shell and never went anywhere else. He had a 2002 Fiesta petrol and filled up with V+ by accident as we went down the motorway I commented is this car running better? It was.

    I used to run diesels and noticed when I in desperation put supermarket stuff in the performance suffered.

    I have just bought a 2000 Citroen Picasso 1.6 petrol. The reviews at the time was underpowered best go for the 1.8 ordiesel etc etc. I looked at the handbook and Citroen say use Super UL.

    Well after 6 weeks of Sheel V+ I ma noticing the imrpoovment in performance not sure about MPG but cant be worse.

    If your thinking of changing give it 100 miles you cant expect results overnight it depends on the age of the car and state of the engine but the more you use it the better it gets and if you still have the emissions print out for MOT the previous year run your car on nothing but V+ and then see what the print out says at your next MOT.

    I suspect when cars car tested by the likes of Clarkeson etc standard fuel is used.

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  • February 22, 2016 at 10:47 am
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    I’ve filled up again at Tesco using the momentum fuel, I was looking at the advert on the nozzle handle when I noticed it actually says ‘BP momentum’. Can’t see why they’d get away with lying about it, so it’s good enough for me.

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    • November 28, 2016 at 10:55 am
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      I have filled Tesco momentum recently, twice. Second time I have noticed the difference! My Ford Focus 1.6 sport felt like puling a very heavy trailer and the engine sound gone hoarse! No more supermarket super fuels!

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  • May 26, 2016 at 2:18 am
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    I didn’t know that petrol garage there are different until i notice something that sasol, shell, and total those garage petrol burn quick in engen and it changes the sound of an engen than than I realised that only engen that is good for my car. Im in south africa

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  • May 28, 2016 at 10:42 pm
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    Well BP fuel sucks thats certain. I usually use Tesco Diesel and my car runs without problem however i used BP once because i was in desperate need of fuel and it made my car run like shit, it was like the engine aged 10 years. There was blue smoke it was jumpy and stalled so i ran it down to half empty (cant say half full as it was a negative expirience) and filled up at tesco and its already doing alot better. BP should be better not worse was very disappointed.

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    • June 4, 2016 at 9:25 am
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      I don’t change my car very often, so some will say my experience is limited. However, I tow a caravan, and do not see the point of running a super powerful vehicle all year, just so I can tow on holiday. I had a 1.6 litre petrol Renault Scenic for thirteen years, and found that, when towing, I had to avoid BP petrol or it just would not climb hills at all. Supermarket petrol was always OK. Further experience showed that if I filled up at any garage (any brand) that had a ‘super’ alternative, then I would get poorer performance from the standard fuel, and when forced into using such a garage on holiday I would have to choose the ‘super’.
      I now have had a 1.5 Diesel Scenic for seven years, and the experience is NOT the same. Supermarket fuel seems to lead to a slow decline in performance over many months. Last week I filled up at one of those ‘independent’ garages who shift their prices up to several times a day. I was on a regular run past the site every day, and saw the price vary by up to 3p/litre according to time of day. When it was at the low price, I filled up, and had at least 8 mpg improvement (on the computer, not towing) and then later it towed like a dream. On the next fill (at Asda) performance went straight back to normal poor pulling.
      I am now convinced, and will look for branded/super whenever I am towing.

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      • June 20, 2016 at 9:03 am
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        Further to my last comment. I was still using the Asda diesel that I ended up with on my last trip and, without towing, I was getting about 54mpg. I filled up a few days ago at a Shell station, costing 2p/ltr more than the local supermarkets, and the computer now shows 60mpg with no effort involved. I reckon that level of improvement is worth an extra four miles to get the branded fuel AND the extra cost of it. Shame there are only supermarket fuels near to me . . .

    • November 28, 2016 at 11:00 am
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      You used only once? That’s the problem. Your petrol tank my have sludgy deposit at the bottom and that may have dissolved with BP fuel and hence you may have been experiencing a cleaning effect. To see the difference you will have to drive about 100 to 200 miles so that your system will be cleaned well.

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  • June 17, 2016 at 4:49 pm
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    I’ve been driving for over 60 years (March 1956) and this is my opinion on petrol quality. For about ten years I have been driving exclusively on Shell regular unleaded and would never go back to supermarket petrol again, but I am surprised at comments like “filled up with super fuel and the car shot off like a rocket”. Shell will tell you that their fuel cleans your engine of carbon deposits and from my experience that is true but it does not happen with your first tank full, it takes weeks and sometimes months to get the best results from super fuels. My Honda now runs better from first starting and pulls up gradients easier but it took time to achieve these improvements in performance.

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  • July 10, 2016 at 10:01 am
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    Mmm, interesting reading. I landed on here after asking the question, re supermarket fuels v named. I am deffo no boy racer, (65) but noticed my 1.6 Octavia goes far better on the Esso diesel, than it did on Asda diesel. After read the other comments here, I conclude I am not imagining it, so will avoid supermarket fuels from now on. Deffo getting more miles to the gallon too, so a no brainer really.

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  • July 11, 2016 at 10:09 pm
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    1.5 dacia Logan diesel Mcv laureate just done cornwall to yorkshire, 687 round trip, cruise control on a30,m5,42,m1, 70mph 2 sTops , fuel currently 148miles to next refill ,New car 68.5mpg,currently back in cornwall getting 61.9mpg local. On Bp ultimate,think that I will see what V power can do.

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  • July 16, 2016 at 1:15 pm
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    Used Asda diesel once never again, I find Morrisons City diesel to be OK. Obtain 44mpg overall brim to brim from my Kia Ceed crdi 7 speed dct, previous Ceed with torque converter auto box only got 34 mpg overall.

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  • July 25, 2016 at 10:36 am
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    Hi all,
    I’ve ended up on this form because i filled my car up with Esso fuel recently and noticed quite a difference in performance so i decided to do some research which is why i ended up on this form.
    I have a Volvo V70 and normally use Sainsbury’s supermarket fuel. Since using the the Esso fuel(which is only because i’m away on holiday and was the only fuel station near) I have noticed quite a bit in performance. It definitely runs a lot smother, has more power and goes up hills much easier than before. I can’t comment on MPG but will check this on my way back home from holiday when i refill with Esso fuel but i can say i won’t be using supermarket fuels again. i have a few shell stations at home so will try them when i get back. I forgot to say that my engine is 2.4 5 cylinder Petrol. 2002

    Reply
  • August 3, 2016 at 8:45 am
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    Tesco Momentum 99 is frequently reported as having the highest Octane number of any pump petrol in the UK. Not quite true. Shell V Power Nitro+ is also rated at 99 RON. BP sells (from very few outlets in must be said) it Ultimate Unleaded 102. With, yes – you got it – a 102 RON rating.

    Back to Momentum 99. What is often not disclosed is that it has the lowest calorific value of any pump petrol available in the UK.

    Reply
  • August 4, 2016 at 11:25 am
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    I have had a number of vehicles for the last 19 years that I have been driving and can report this:
    – on my first car (1.1 litre, high compression engine, designed to run on 4 star leaded), was pinging on 95 octane (any brand), despite retarded ignition (turned distributor a bit). It stopped pinging on Shell V power, but would always ping if reverting back to 95 octane. It also pinged a bit on Tesco 98 Super, almost as good as Shell 99, but I stayed with Shell. Then I completely switched to Shell VPower, and after 20k miles, tried 95 octane again, and it ran fine. A mechanic friend explained how the Super Shell fuel cleaned the engine, de-coked it and hence this new clean engine could now run on cheaper fuel too. But I chose to keep running it on Shell VPower. The car is now 26 years old and still runs fine (with new owner, whom I told to run it on Shell VPower and he has done).
    – most of my other cars were diesels though:
    I do a lot of driving on the continent, and I have kept very detailed logs of every single fill up location, quantity, brand and price in 80k miles that I drove a Skoda Superb 2.5 tdi (V6 diesel, automatic). A lot of the time (almost all the time), I would put just enough fuel into the car in the UK to take me to Calais or Dunkirk where I would brim it on the cheapest Carrefour supermarket fuel I could find. Then I would gun it across the continent, and again in Austria I would fill up at the cheapest pump (ENI is normally cheap, not supermarket though. I can confirm that with regular normal fuel system maintenance (diesel filter every 20k miles) and regular oil changes (every 7 k miles synthetic oil and filter) the car NEVER had a hiccup on the cheap stuff.
    I also filled up many times at UK supermarkets and I can’t categorically state that the car had worse fuel economy or performance as I have not done a scientific back to back identical temperature, identical journey test. However, I have found my local [Name removed by website editor] to OVERCLOCK the fuel pump (the Skoda has a 54 litre tank when the light comes on that’s all I could squeeze in in France, but I could put in 56 litres at [Name removed by website editor]. Same petrol station, this time my wife’s Honda jazz – 34 litre fuel tank, running on vapours at BP/Shell I could squeeze in 33.5-34 litres. As [Name removed by website editor] I managed 38 litres twice without trying! Needless to say, I stopped using them. No point in saving 2p a litre when they rob you in broad daylight.
    I have also had ONE case on filling up with [Name removed by website editor] diesel, then immediately getting onto the Mway (M40), uncrowded, and I drove gently), and 40 miles into the journey, the average trip mpg was showing only 36 mpg. But might have been headwind, as it only happened once. I have stopped using [Name removed by website editor]. Asda, I never had a problem. I used Asda extensively in my old Peugeot 506 2.1 sd turbo diesel. I got exactly the same mpg running on BP, premium BP, or Asda diesel. Again with 20k mile fuel filter replacements.
    I do believe a lot of problems are caused by poor maintenance and a lower detergent content may just tip the car over the edge. Also driver ignorance with regards to what is the right car for the job play part. Buying a DPF Euro 5/6 car and then abusing it on short journeys, regardless what diesel you put in it it will suffer, guaranteed. Perhaps I am just lucky that my 8 mile each way commute to work when combined with the occasional blast across the continent can just keep things nice and clean, perhaps the commute on its own would kill the DPF, I don’t know. I drive a Peugeot 5008 now (2.0 diesel), and when it goes into particulate filter regeneration, I don’t stop the car, I go round the block until it has completed its job. This happens every 3-4 weeks. On a long journey maybe once every 600-800 miles, and I then take it up to 80 to ensure enough heat in the exhaust to purge the DPF. I guess a lot of people don’t pay attention to this, just turning the engine off, then moan that it’s due to the supermarket fuel that the EGR valve or DPF are blocked/seized. And I do put all sorts of brands into my car, from cheap French supermarket to premium Belgian branded diesel, to Tesco standard EN590 diesel, or even Greek refinery LUK diesel – which by the way has the highest energy content and longest range on a tank I have ever had. Just done a trip and got over 700 miles to a tank.
    In summary, if you do long journeys, I would not waste money on branded diesel but make use you maintain the car to the recommended schedule, particularly the fuel system, but for short journeys it is worth spending more.

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    • August 4, 2016 at 1:34 pm
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      Hi Alexander,

      I agree strongly with your conclusion that cars which are used properly (i.e. not just local runarounds) tend to have fewer engine and fuel-related problems. This especially applies to diesels. I too have driven all over the continent, usually filling up with the cheapest/most readily available fuel and have never had any problems.

      I’ve also used all the supermarkets and branded outlets in the UK and never had a problem or noticed any significant difference between them. Cars are happy when used for long runs. So many common problems — DPF, flat batteries, air con, etc — are related to lack of ‘proper’ use.

      Regards,
      Roland
      simplemotoring.co.uk

      Reply
  • August 16, 2016 at 9:28 pm
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    Hi there,
    I am Italian from north region and I have a 210.000 KM Alfa 159 1.9 diesel with autostick.

    I have been told by an expert friend of mine that the premium diesel would have cleaned all the parts so well that would have been not enough lubricated, so I spent most of the time running on supermarket oil. Last may I noticed a DPF issue, due my calm way of driving, and black smoke at hexhaust at first brutal accelaration after a long time.

    Since then, I use premium diesel from ENI, that seems to be the most advanced on the market. I suffer for the 0,17€/liter extra cost, but I hope it will help to have longer motor life. I am really scared about pump and injectors problems, so I hope that special fuel will prevent from rust and others.

    By the way, this friend of mine told me that the best way to go with a car (he has a 500.000 km opel astra that he uses for motoring tests as well), is to spend money in maintenance instead of special fuels or additives. I have to admit that using premium diesel costs me 600,00 € more/year, exactly the price of a deep and accurate injectors manual cleaning.

    No mileage difference between the two oil sorts; but a huuuge difference when i passed from 225/50-17 tyres (7,8l/100km) to 205/55-16 (6,5 liters/100 km): more than 100 km more for every full tank.

    I take the advantage of this comment to remind that regular diesel has to be composed with at least 7% renewable materials; but sometimes renewable means exhausted (reconditioned) oils, and quality is really a big variable also according to regions. What makes swear too, is the water, that is produced by temperature excursion during day and night, and the distributor’s tank filters maintenance.

    Anyhow, I think my next car will run on gasoline, that has the plus of simpler and less professional-use and care engines.

    Many thanks to you all for your time

    Reply
  • September 16, 2016 at 8:15 pm
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    Hi I’ve got a Smart diesel, I’ve had it for just over a week. When I first run it it’s fine, very nippy, then I stop maybe for an appointment then off we go again brill, then go into the supermarket do some shopping head off home. Going down the by pass the car then doesn’t want to pull at 25 m p h how embarrassing. With cars honking at me I crawl along with hazards on because I can’t pull over anywhere. Well I rang the garage where I brought the car from and because no lights come up on the dash he asked me what diesel I was putting in, Sainsburys I replied, he said drain it out and go to Shell, put in the highest premium and see what happens, this I’m doing tomorrow. After reading the comments here I really hope it works, as I feel I’m in danger or a danger on the roads in this car.

    Reply
    • September 19, 2016 at 9:52 am
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      I would suggest to doublecheck if all the filters and oil substitution has been made or not. And I would change the fuel filter instead of fuel. This is very, very important. In 35.000 km there are 300 grams weight difference between a new filter and a used one. Keep us updated!

      Reply
  • September 16, 2016 at 8:16 pm
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    Interesting reading

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  • September 17, 2016 at 7:34 pm
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    Hi, interesting read. Here’s my story and findings, I was a mechanic by trade when younger and put any old fuel in my car when younger. I had a 2008 1.9 tdi Seat Ibiza always ran on on supermarket fuels and the occasional Vpower tank with a noticable difference in power & pick up, managed 230,000km & 50-55mpg without problems. I changed to an 2015 1.6 tdi Ibiza with DPF last year. I started with supermarket fuel and saw regens every 3-400km for the first 3 months with the instant economy meter reading noticeably higher when active regens occuring. My local Shell dealer started under cutting the supermarket prices so I tried the Shell fuelsave and have not noticed another regen since, Now Vpower does not make any difference to this car as it did the old 1.9. I have also started using a diesel product called Archoil AR-6200 fuel complex. I have a VagCom diagnostic cable and have monitored the DPF soot levels since new, they have slowed down since using the Shell/Archoil combo, so I’m gonna stick with this combo. Averaging 62/66mpg 4.2/4.5l/100km 30,000km. These results are doing same work journey of 45km eachway. (I’m an ex-pat in Spain so hence the km, mpg).

    Jon

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  • September 17, 2016 at 7:37 pm
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    Forgot to say, I have been looking for info on the Shell Fuelsave sulphur content, anybody have any info on this?
    Thanks in advance Jon

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    • October 31, 2016 at 2:04 pm
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      Hi Jon, sulphur value is all the same for every oil sold in Europe. Ten parts per million, since 2009. The low value was why I was starting to use special diesel in 2002: halving the particulate was the effect. For more information you can ask me. All the best

      Reply
      • December 2, 2016 at 9:21 pm
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        Cheers Françios, I’m in south eastern Spain and regularly using the Shell fuelsave as mentioned before, I was just wondering if any known scientific differences in the BP, Repsol or Shell normal or expensive fuels. Going to try some BP Ultimate soon.

  • September 25, 2016 at 12:36 pm
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    Well after using s/market petrol change to diesel car. I kept using s/m diesel, after 4 months had trouble with performance. Had to have DPFilter cleaned. So I’ve gone on to BP top grade diesel. Filled to brim, I’ll come back after a week or so and let yous know my thoughts. 18p a ltr dearer than s/m’s cheapy.

    Reply
  • October 29, 2016 at 1:50 am
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    since Esso introduced price match some years ago l have mostly used Esso diesel .l still use Esso and am confident of their additive regime over s/market fuel to not change my usage. The car (Citroen Picasso 2ltr ) has not had any serious engine problems at 95000 miles engine oil and filter once a year, no injector problems no topping engine oil between oil changes and minimal servicing.L have now sold the car (too ill to drive now) but advised buyer to stay with Esso. This car doesn”t have particulate filter so no worries there, Incidentally the car is 2001 and has original battery though thats nothing to do with Esso Happy motoring folks.

    Reply
  • November 14, 2016 at 8:11 pm
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    Hi,

    I built an ignition management systems for classic racing, which allows me to control all aspects fuel management: ignition timing curve and multispark, whist measuring bore temperature, and combustion temperature. I’ve tested different fuels, which might be interesting to some people:

    1) At 5500rmp on a 175cc two stroke, supermarket premium unleaded ‘knocks’ at 15deg before top dead centre, momentum 99 ‘knocks’ at 12deg before top dead centre, Vpower 99 ‘knocks’ at 12deg before top dead centre. This delayed ignition (closer to top dead centre) is what increases your fuel economy, as you are increasing the effective compression ratio of the engine. Go Wiki ‘Octance Rating’ and ‘Compression Ratio’. Modern cars optimise the angle of ignition depending on the detonation point of the fuel whilst you are driving, which is why you are finding that some petrols are more thermally efficient than others.

    2) Even though Momentum 99 and Vpower were found to have the same Octane Rating so can be ignited at the same point for the same efficiency, Momentum 99 runs leaner than VPower which leads to an increase in engine temperature (Modern cars compensate for this). I can only guess this is because Momentum 99 uses an ethanol octance booster and VPower relies on a more sophisticated octane booster similar to the old lead in petrol. Adding Ethanol into a fuel makes the fuel mixture leaner, so it will run hotter. Bore temperature is also higher with momentum 99, so I can only assume VPower has improved lubricants in the fuel so reduce friction longer lasting engine).

    I use VPower with lead additive for racing. It’s legal for classic racing (I think 100,000 gallons or something like that are made available each year for historic use) DON’T PUT LEAD IN A ROAD CAR. It will destroy your catalytic converter, and I don’t like the idea of kids breathing it in.

    Cheers

    Reply
  • December 3, 2016 at 6:08 pm
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    Hello,
    I used to work in a oil refinery and I work in a area just before the fuel go to the tankers.
    All the fuel is the same! All the diesel that we produce is base product, this then get sent to tankers that the tankers will connect to. This is the magic bit, as the tankers have up to 6 tanks inside itself, when the fuel is being pumped off the tanker will input a code and the fuel he wants is pumped but also a injection of additives. There a number of additives used by the company’s. There are some super markets who use shells and BP additives but a small dose. Asda do not buy bottom of the tank! It all gets the same base! The same with petrol we produce two types 95 Ron and 99 ron, once it again the additives! A shell tanker will use the 99 ron then next tanker will be a Tesco one useing the same fuel, just different amount of additive! So you can pay more for more additive! Also when blending petrol and diesel they can be difference between every time you pump! For example petrol is batched so all the requirements are tight and there is no give away on Normal 95 ron, but nextime you could go and that batch has had high give away and full of gtl and have ron 98. But they all will meet a minimum! The bio- ethanol is also pumped in to the tanker the legal limit is 10% and minimum is 5% and you do get less Miles per gallon with the 10% but it’s more greener! And if I am correct by 2020 as European law this is the minimum! It also worth noteing that during 1990s the additive used to be put in via hand by the drivers, and shell driver used to put buckets loads in tanker as they thought there where helping the customer, but this [allegedly] caused engine damage! So more is not all ways the best!

    Reply

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